Taylor, London or Taylor Brothers

Discussion in 'Forum: Saw Identification and Discussion' started by fred0325, May 3, 2011.

  1. ray

    ray Administrator Staff Member

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    668
    Hi Fred,

    Here's a quick answer (for a change :) ) the original Taylor Brothers were Joseph and John, so maybe they chose to use "I" rather than "J" as a means of distinguishing between them..

    J. Taylor, I Taylor, J & I Taylor and a zillion other brands..

    I haven't given a whole lot of thought to this, and it's most likely flawed reasoning...

    Regards
    Ray
     
  2. Loading...

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    Need Help

    I am a newbie here but I joined this forum because I read this thread about the Taylor Brothers saws and I happen to have one which I would like to learn more about.

    This was handed down to me and I really want to know more

    [​IMG]

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    I want to know age, history and value $ how much its worth.

    Thanks
     
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  4. fred0325

    fred0325 Most Valued Member

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    Hi,

    I am not sure that I can be a lot of help on this, but I will try what I can.

    Unfortunately there is no indication of which "Adelaide Works" that your saw was made in from the saw itself. According to "Hand Saw Makers Of Britain" Taylor Brothers existed between 1849 and 1915 (possibly a little later). But they called their premises the Adelaide Works for all but 1 year (1855) of that time, and so that is not much help.

    The thing that I did notice is that you have split nuts but a raised medallion. I would guess that the medallion alone would put the saw at 1900 to 1914 -ish, (possibly a little later or earlier but not much) but I do stand to be corrected on that. These two features do not really mix on many saws that I have seen. It is either split nuts and flat medallion or domed nuts and a raised medallion.

    I have never seen the full name "Taylor Brothers" before. Perhaps others have and that may help with deterimining the age. The mark does appear on the marks graphic that Kiwi has put on, on the 2nd post to this topic.

    The saw appears to be brass backed and so it has a bit of quality to it. As regards price, How long is a piece of string? On the very first post I referred to a "Taylor London" going for a very reasonable price. I have forgotten exactly how much but in excess of GBP30 whereas I paid less than 1/3 rd of that for mine. It depends who wants it on the day.

    I think that one downside to your saw is that it is another example that has been subject to the "Fred school of saw plate straightening", and which has not done it any favours

    Would it be possible to put a full image of the saw on? It may help in determining age and I would love to see it in any case

    Fred
     
  5. Loading...

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    Thanks Fred, I appreciate the info

    What do you mean to put the image of the whole saw on, I put up three photos with one showing the whole saw? Explain what you mean and I am happy to snap a few more photos ;)

    So you think the value is around A$60?

    A guy enquired to buy it and I always valued this saw over all my other saws so when he asked I started to enquire more... I am moving overseas and dont have the luxury of taking my tools with me, so I started selling :( I hate parting with my tools... thats life...
     
  6. TraditionalToolworks

    TraditionalToolworks Most Valued Member

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    I wouldn't fret over a saw, after all, that is what it is at the end of the day...a saw...

    $60 ain't gonna make/break your life is it? :rolleyes:

    I have a few Taylors, they're ok. If your not gonna sharpen it up and use it, sell it, IMO, or keep it because you like it.

    But if you can't figure how much the saw is worth to you, don't ask others to do that for you...:p
     
    Last edited: Feb 13, 2012
  7. ray

    ray Administrator Staff Member

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    668
    Hi Loading,

    I like Taylor brothers handle style, and it's a nice looking saw.

    The saw plate looks to be a bit wrinkled, which is a shame, it restricts somewhat the value as a user saw.

    I don't generally like to value saws, simply because I don't know how to. I've never sold a saw, I've often given saws away to friends and relatives, but never sold any.

    Just out of interest...Taylor Brothers named The Adelaide works for Queen Adelaide, same reason the city Adelaide was named.

    Regards
    Ray
     
  8. fred0325

    fred0325 Most Valued Member

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    1,084
    Hi Loading,

    Sorry, you are right. I am afraid it is my technophobia again.
    I don't know why but on my computer you have to scroll across the whole page and I only looked at the part of picture 2 that showed the blade and the stamp.

    Having scrolled across the page and now seen it, I am none the wiser really. I know that "London Flat" handles (which I particularly like) did appear after the turn of the century, but my less than perfect instinct is to put this a little before that. But with the raised medallion?? Now that I do find interesting but I suspect that you will need a catalogue to date it anywhere near accurately.

    I don't think that any of this will affect value, but if this was mine I would try to tuck it away somewehere and take it with me. At least until I had answered the question of age and the mark properly. But perhaps that is just me liking to solve mysteries.

    If Simon reads this he may be able to shed a little more light on it. He may even have a copy of the mark in his embryonic book.

    Fred