J Taylor & Son Back Saw

Discussion in 'Forum: Saw Identification and Discussion' started by enjuneer, Jan 7, 2018.

  1. enjuneer

    enjuneer Member

    Messages:
    17
    I just picked up this J Taylor & Son back saw because of the unusual domed nuts. The saw itself looks like it had been nailed to the side of a barn. It is beyond saving, in my opinion. I bought it since I'd not seen this style of saw nut before. It isn't really a split nut and not a normal domed nut, as the slots are cut into the sloped side.

    Does anyone know when this saw might have been made? The spine is marked with "J Taylor & Son, Sheffield" and with the lamb trademark.
     

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  2. Barleys

    Barleys Most Valued Member

    Messages:
    544
    Sorry to see that so far no one has gritted their teeth and looked usefully at this awful old relic. The screws and nuts are perhaps made out of iron, but I really don't know for sure, as I've not seen any documentation of saw screw materials apart from the specifying of brass or nickel plated; as for date, it's also very difficult, as the design would fit for anything between about 1870 and 1910, I think. These screws are evidently very effective, judging by the amount of damage from tightening them to the wood on the reverse – maybe the makers had devised a special tool for gripping the nut. Raised screws in the 19th century tended to suggest quality, and maybe once upon a time this was indeed a quality saw, and the screws were plated, even though J.Taylor was one of Taylor Bros many product lines on saws of less than the top quality. It's the foresight to collect this kind of example, usually overlooked as one steps back in horror at the overall condition, that made Ken Hawley able to establish the comprehensiveness of his collection.
    Thanks for showing to us.
    Simon
     
  3. kiwi

    kiwi Most Valued Member

    Messages:
    305
    I also provide accommodation for "rescue saws", and have the same iron screws on a J H Andrew & Co handsaw (fits with Simon's "the design would fit for anything between about 1870 and 1910, I think"
    [​IMG]


    Somewhat similar raised iron screws on my nice Joseph Peace saw of c1860s
    [​IMG]
    My "Rotherham" saw of unknown provenance has domed iron screws, but regular brass split nuts on the reverse
    http://www.backsaw.net/forum/index.php?threads/johnson-and-rotherham.490/
    but the most common domed iron screws on my saws have domed iron cap screws on the reverse. (My examples include a 28* Beardshaw, 26" Spear&Jackson, 12" Daedalus backsaw (Tyzack), 26" J Taylor&Son)
    [Note; domed brass split nuts are on my Guinea saw]
    [​IMG]
     
    Last edited: Feb 6, 2018
  4. enjuneer

    enjuneer Member

    Messages:
    17
    Gentlemen, Thanks for providing some information on the saw screws on my poor old Taylor saw. It is in such poor shape that it is good for nothing beyond study. Having built a few saws for my own use, I have been paying more attention to the design features on vintage examples. The nuts on this Taylor are definitely different from the ubiquitous flat split nuts, but have proven to be effective in their job. Now I have to wonder about the design of the tool used to engage these nuts. It would seem to be more complex to manufacture than the nuts themselves.