Corby Bolts

Discussion in 'Saw Makers Forum' started by TraditionalToolworks, Nov 4, 2022.

  1. TraditionalToolworks

    TraditionalToolworks Most Valued Member

    Messages:
    187
    I mentioned in a previous post that I am starting to realize that saws should not be designed to have the plate replaced and/or taken apart, it seems more logical to build so that the saw never comes apart.

    One thing that made me think that way is the Corby bolts. The Corby bolts are a takeoff on the Loveless pins, which are a stainless sleeve with a screw. Both of these designs were intended to allow snug up when assembled with epoxy, to hold it together, but after it dries the ends are first cut off with a band saw, and then ground on a belt grinder.

    I bought these copper Corby Bolts which I may use in my knifes and/or handsaws.

    I show how the Corby opened to show that there is a flat section that extends through the knife tang, as it could do the same on a handsaw handle. All you need to do is make them deeper, I think I could make some bronze ones using 1/2" bronze rod, epoxy everything together, handle, nuts, saw plate, et al...

    Loveless

    top_loveless_fasteners.jpg

    Corby

    corby-bolts-copper.jpg


    Any comments?
     
  2. pedder

    pedder Active Member

    Messages:
    42
    I, too, thought about designing a saw without screws.
    I would just use epoxy and no rivets or screws of any kind.
     
  3. TraditionalToolworks

    TraditionalToolworks Most Valued Member

    Messages:
    187
    Yes, I think back on one of the very early sawmakers, Vlad Spehar of Spehar-Toolworks who used a laminated back/plate, but I think he did use split-nuts. There's got to be a better way to assemble this type of tool. I do think Rob Lee came up with an interesting solution, although I've never been very fond of the synthetic materials, this handle is made of wood in an automated fashion, but it also allows people to make a replacement handle and that aspect of the LV design gets a touche.

    I think there is some validity to building a saw that doesn't disassemble. Even if a saw costs $500, or $750 as someone appears to have paid for that Wenzloff saw at the Charlesworth estate. That's not a lot of money by any means. It's pretty easy to spend that much at the grocery store...in a new bags. I bet I could spend that on meat/fish.