Chamfering brass flat stock

Discussion in 'Saw Makers Forum' started by TraditionalToolworks, May 7, 2012.

  1. TraditionalToolworks

    TraditionalToolworks Most Valued Member

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    I have been experimenting with some brass and the Burr-Beaver seems to work pretty good depending on how one feeds it.

    I have my large pulley for my Nichols in the shop being welded, so that I can leave that one on the machine all the time. I'll have 2 more speeds to try with the double angle cutters.

    The Bur-Beaver works pretty darn good though, just seems a bit finicky to understand. I suspect bronze will be a bit harder to chamfer on it.

    Here's a link to the tool:

    [​IMG]
     
  2. Isaac S

    Isaac S Member

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    5
    Just out of curiosity, have you ever used a router to chamfer the spines? If so, how does the finish compare to the Bur-Beaver?

    Regards,
    Isaac
     
  3. TraditionalToolworks

    TraditionalToolworks Most Valued Member

    Messages:
    181
    Isaac,

    No, I haven't tried it but JoeF mentioned to me that whoever makes your backs does it that way.

    I was able to get close enough with this machine that I think I could finish up the minor touch-up with a file...but the idea is to get as clean as possible. I still need to try my horizontal mill when I get the step pulley back from the welding shop. I think I would like to get the chamfers the same size as the flat on top, and only chamfer the nose and top.

    The backs I am slotting are good enough for a kit, IMO. I'm still ironing out my split-nuts. I think I will be producing my own split-nuts to provide with my own kits also.

    I could match Wenzloff & Sons on slotted back pricing, but want to provide a better value with more detail if possible. I would like to provide the back/plate as one unit. That way the person building a kit would only need to worry about assembly and the handle.
     
  4. Isaac S

    Isaac S Member

    Messages:
    5
    He does chamfer them with a router. He just made a 45 degree bit out of HSS, and the finish is good enough that it just requires a little sanding. I think the key is making sure the brass is held very tight to the fence.

    Isaac
     
  5. TraditionalToolworks

    TraditionalToolworks Most Valued Member

    Messages:
    181
    If that is the case and they also need to be lightly sanded, this Bur-Beaver will do that for me. This is pretty safe, as the cutter is only on the chamfer underneath, and this is really quick to run through the machine.

    I was hoping to get an absolute perfect chamfer and think I might be able to do that on the horizontal mill, given more speed. I have my 5-step pulley in the shop being repaired so I can try the 2 higher speeds, I'm currently using a 3-step pulley.

    The one area I need to devise a fixture is for doing the nose, I'm currently using a small Starrett 4" square for the nose, and would like to make something more secure to hold it while it moves the nose end over the cutter.
     
  6. Isaac S

    Isaac S Member

    Messages:
    5
    Do you just push the brass through the Bur-Beaver by hand? Do you need a fence or holddowns? And do you climb cut with it? It looks like a good idea for putting the chamfers on.

    My machinist tried doing it on the mill, but said it was very difficult. I think he was having problems with rigidity, and every little variation is very visible on a small chamfer like this.

    Isaac
     
  7. TraditionalToolworks

    TraditionalToolworks Most Valued Member

    Messages:
    181
    Yes, I push it through by hand. I would like to make a small fence that will ride on the top of the plate, to hold the back at a 90 degree to chamfer the nose, but I can get a pretty good one by doing it with a small Starrett, and holding it.

    The Bur-Beaver is quite an expensive unit, about $1500, but I bought a used for about $325 and got a new cutter for it ($90). I have about $425 into it.

    This works quite well, but I need to try this with higher speed (i.e., mentioned waiting for the 5-step pulley to come back from the welder).

    What I might be able to do is have those 2 angle cutters together and a screw slotting saw so that I could slot and chamfer by just moving the table. I can slot a 20" back with this setup.

    And on the Bur-Beaver it's easy to push it through, so that might be best time wise.
     

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    Last edited: May 9, 2012