Bad Axe introduce (modernised) Seymour-Smith hammer (punch) saw-set

Discussion in 'Saw Makers Forum' started by shoarthing, Feb 11, 2024.

  1. shoarthing

    shoarthing Most Valued Member

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    IMG_5426.jpeg https://badaxetoolworks.com/collections/tools-and-accessories/products/bad-axe-saw-set

    . . . appears to be usefully focused on backsaw-size tooth-pitches ie 10-20 ppi.
     
  2. pedder

    pedder Most Valued Member

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    What is the advantage compared to a pliere shaped saw set?
     
  3. shoarthing

    shoarthing Most Valued Member

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    Regularity & speed. Hammer-sets mimic the dynamics of the technique used in 18th/19th-century saw-manufacture (hammer-setting upon special anvils). Here's Charles Holtzapffel (writing between 1827-43; pub: 1846) on the techniques used around/before H1 C19th:

    IMG_5593 Large.jpeg IMG_5594 Large.jpeg

    . . . . delightfully, Holtzapffel goes on to describe (for circular saws) the first embodiment known to me of a hammer saw-set; viz:

    IMG_5595 Large.jpeg
     
    Last edited: Mar 25, 2024
  4. Dusty Shed Dweller

    Dusty Shed Dweller Most Valued Member

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    Peddar asks an interesting question, and having set tens of thousands of saws I think it's clear what the best method for my own purposes is. Set enough saws and you will know too.

    Saws were traditionally set with a narrow faced hammer over a simple bevel filed into the edge of a vice or block. It certainly was a fast method.

    You have have rapid or consistency in setting saws, you can't have both. And no method is rapid on fine teeth because you have to take the time to align each tooth with the anvil, they're hard to see and there's a lot of them.
     
  5. Dusty Shed Dweller

    Dusty Shed Dweller Most Valued Member

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    146
    I'm not familiar with Badaxe's revamped design but I would add an adjustable dog/pawl so you can rapidly align the plate with the next tooth to be worked. This would speed up the process of re-locating the plate every time which is a major rate limitation.
     
  6. shoarthing

    shoarthing Most Valued Member

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    117
  7. pedder

    pedder Most Valued Member

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    49
    I haven't set tens of thousands of saws but a few hundred. Most of them in the range from 14-20 tpi.
    Allways used pliers. Eclipse 77 and copies. I have upgraded them with a new anvil. They are extremply precise now.

    For the hammerset I would need an indicator and I don't see a reason, why it hasn't one.
    Like Lunn or Shelton show on their flypresses to stamp teeth.
     
  8. TraditionalToolworks

    TraditionalToolworks Most Valued Member

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    191
    That's quite a claim.:rolleyes:
     
  9. TraditionalToolworks

    TraditionalToolworks Most Valued Member

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    Me neither, but this seems to me that it is much harder to be consistent in the set along the plate.


    Andrew showed a pic once of him hammer the individual teeth with a hammer and punch on an anvil.

    I've seen Shelton method, which seems to be a better approach to getting consistent set. No question in my mind, he
    makes the best saws to date. My hat is off to Shelton!