Woodward, VR Crowns

Discussion in 'Forum: Saw Identification and Discussion' started by kiwi, Feb 9, 2019.

  1. kiwi

    kiwi Most Valued Member

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    I sometimes pick up rusty old saws for the fun of looking for a blade stamp/etch, if they're cheap enough. This 28" 3-1/2 ppi nibbed ripsaw has a replacement handle, fairly straight blade with some rust pitting and a concave toothline, but was mine for a $1 bid. Turns out it has an interesting blade stamp.
    The name appears to be "WOODWARD" which may be a sawmaker, a retailer, or a trade name, but I haven't been able to find a likely Woodward in the usual references. Unfortunately, pitting obscures the area where "sheffield" might have been stamped, so its possible the saw was made elsewhere
    Also, the 3 crowns surrounding the name are each accompanied with the letters "V R" (VR presumably stands for Victoria Rex, the queen of England at the time of the saw manufacture)
    Any ideas on origins for "Woodward" ?
    Any other examples of saws having crowns with V R ? (or other tools marked similarly)

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  2. Ken

    Ken Member

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    This ebony handled one recently popped up on ebay

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  3. kiwi

    kiwi Most Valued Member

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    Thanks Ken. I wonder if the VR mark was used exclusively by companies holding a royal warrant
    Green and Son are listed as cutlery suppliers in the January 1893 London Gazette "List of Tradesmen who hold Warrants of Appointment from the Lord Steward, with authority to use the Royal Arms". The list includes suppliers of numerous items, including; fruit, wine corks, lawn mowing machines, lavender essence....
    But I haven't found "Woodward" in these lists yet
     
  4. Ken

    Ken Member

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    There is a Royal Warrant Holders Association website. No help in identifying Woodward but it does have some history which may or may not be relevant. Formed in 1840 by the 1870s/ 1880's the association had succeeded in getting rules about display of the warrant tightened. Specifically unauthorised use was outlawed (which implies that before 1870/80 it wasn't illegal) bankrupts automatically lost their warrant, and warrants were no longer automatically retained on acquisition or merger. If the Woodward saw was made before the 1880's then this potentially implies a bunch of reasons why Woodward may not appear on lists. Then of course there remains the possibility that Woodward did legitimately hold a warrant but perhaps only fleetingly...
     
  5. Batman3000

    Batman3000 New Member

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  6. ray

    ray Administrator Staff Member

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    Funny, being a Victorian, the same thought crossed my mind. However, In this case I think the clue is "Cutlers to Her Majesty" indicates it's likely to be "Victoria Rex"

    On the other hand I wonder what engraved "2nd Kitchen Maid" mark is about, I suspect it may have been a gift at some stage in it's life. Although what a kitchen maid would want with a saw is a mystery?
     
  7. David

    David Most Valued Member

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    I think in her case it's feminine, so Victoria Regina.
     
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