Tom Veatino? or there abouts

Discussion in 'Forum: Saw Identification and Discussion' started by need2boat, Mar 26, 2012.

  1. need2boat

    need2boat Most Valued Member

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    This is one of the first saws I got, It was in a trade with a local selling for some other stuff and the blade was etched good when I got it from I'm guess a rust cleaner of some kind.

    I can kind of read the etch but not having any luck finding info on the web.

    It looks to say something like
    Tom Veatino
    Torn Keatino

    Joe
     

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  2. need2boat

    need2boat Most Valued Member

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    It may be helpful to see the the complete saw. The top horn needed replacing.

    Joe
     

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  3. jossimbyr

    jossimbyr Member

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    I would venture that the last name is Keating, or something along those lines. I can almost make out a 'g' instead of an 'o' at the end. Would it be possible for you to provide a higher-resolution image?

    EDIT:

    N/M. Now that I've opened it in Photoshop, I could more easily see the border around the name. A 'g' wouldn't fit in it.
     
    Last edited: Mar 26, 2012
  4. need2boat

    need2boat Most Valued Member

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  5. need2boat

    need2boat Most Valued Member

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    There is also an EB stamped on the handle and in the plate next to "5" for tpi. I figured these were just the owners marks but I did see a few things pop up on Google for a Boston listings for a EB Keating under sawing and planing. Along with WELCH & GRIFFITHS, Manufacturers of Patent Ground and Warranted saws.

    Joe
     
  6. TraditionalToolworks

    TraditionalToolworks Most Valued Member

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    Joe,

    Do you not have Erv's book? There is a Welch & Griffiths in Boston, MA from 1832-1887.

    Welch & Griffiths also have a 3 page history section in Erv's book.

    That's quite a decent saw, IMO. I mean, any saw other than a Disston from North America is a keeper, IMO. It's just pure coolness than there is such a history on Welch & Griffiths in the HSMONA. In fact, it was Charles Griffiths that started to manufacture saws in America in 1830. Prior to that it says everyone was dependent on getting saws from foreign manufacturers. It says Griffiths was involved in saw making in Great Britain also, prior to that (HSMOB shows several Girffiths in Norwich, but no Charles...could have been a son to one).

    He started and appears to have immigrated through NY, but had a rough go, and moved along to Boston.

    They made a lot of larger saws, for sawmills, pit saws, large circular blades, etc...says they provided good saws a low prices.

    What is so fascinating is that Welch & Griffiths pre-dated Disston understanding how to whore out his saws, but it would appear were more focused on larger saws. Very cool saw with that history behind it! ;)
     
  7. TraditionalToolworks

    TraditionalToolworks Most Valued Member

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    There is also a ad from Welch & Griffiths in the back section, and says "Manufacturer of Warrented, Patent Ground, Cast-Steel saws. Wholesale & Retail. Saw Arbors, Shingle, Clapboard & Lathe Machines. 46 & 48 Congress Street, Boston".

    This was from 1855, I'll see if I can scan this to add to this thread.
     
  8. need2boat

    need2boat Most Valued Member

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    I have been on the hunt for a printed copy of Erv's book. It's out of print. I didn't think to post something to this site but I'm guess no one here would really have extra copies.

    Joe
     
  9. TraditionalToolworks

    TraditionalToolworks Most Valued Member

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    Have you contacted Erv?

    I only have 1 of each, North America and Britain.

    I didn't realize they were out of print, I bought mine from Erv about 7 or 8 years ago. Comes in handy. Wish we had an online database of the information.
     
  10. TraditionalToolworks

    TraditionalToolworks Most Valued Member

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    Last edited: Mar 28, 2012
  11. jossimbyr

    jossimbyr Member

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    Gah, I have put off ordering that for the longest time since I only want print books where possible, but I guess I need to bite the bullet and buy it.

    ... Damn my impatience. I'm finishing the purchase now. :p
     
  12. TraditionalToolworks

    TraditionalToolworks Most Valued Member

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    Well, the thing is that this is pretty much the only information available for saw makers, so it does help in trying to figure some of it out.

    The info comes in handy for a lot of saws, the one in this thread as a case in point.
     
  13. jossimbyr

    jossimbyr Member

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    I'm with you on that one. What really enabled me to put off the purchase was the fact that I don't really care much for the American sawmakers, so I don't have much need to research them. Oh well, what's done is done. Now I'm sure I'll find a perfect print copy of the book at a reasonable price (which I'll probably also buy. :p )
     
  14. TraditionalToolworks

    TraditionalToolworks Most Valued Member

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    There was a lot of great saws made in America. I agree, the saws from Britain are much nicer, especially the older ones in the 19th century that had more craftsmanship put into them.

    However, I have great American saws that I like, one being a great saw from San Francisco that I patterned one of my saw designs after.

    The North American book has come in handy for me, as the Britain book as as well. :)
     
  15. jossimbyr

    jossimbyr Member

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    No doubt that there were a lot of great American saws, but the reason I prefer the British saws is because of the handles. It seems to me that, at least on eBay, it's easier to get an affordable old British saw than an affordable old American saw. One American saw that I do have a particular affinity for is the Disston No. 7. I've got a couple that I just really dig.
     
  16. PeterEvans

    PeterEvans Most Valued Member

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    Gee, no copies listed 2nd hand, better keep my copy. There are I believe plenty of copies of the British version available. The latter will no doubt be superceded by the Simon Barley book, which will hopefully be available in the near future... well hope does spring eternal.

    Since 1999, a lot of info has become available, and some of it is on-line; such as the Disstonian and wkfinetools websites. So a new N America book is needed. Don McConnell (co-author of British...) has recorded a lot of additional data on makers - both sides of Atlantic; although I have no idea what/if he intends to publish. Many people have recorded eBay listings of saws. There are lots of saw threads on hand tool fora.

    A clearing house for all this would be very useful. To expect Ray to do it is unreasonable.

    Perhaps someone, unlike Ray and me, who has actually retired!

    Cheers
    Peter
     
  17. jossimbyr

    jossimbyr Member

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    I'm always saving the images of interesting saws from eBay, if only for my personal interest in handle design. I, too, wish there was a larger repository of this information available. Until then, I'll keep compiling and sharing and requesting info on various sites, as will others.