Taylor Brothers -- Two Interesting Saws

Discussion in 'Forum: Saw Identification and Discussion' started by summerfi, Jun 24, 2019.

  1. summerfi

    summerfi Most Valued Member

    Messages:
    183
    Hello friends,
    I'd like to share two Taylor Brothers saws I recently acquired because they are a little different from the standard run-of-the-mill saws.

    First is a 12" brass back saw marked J. Taylor & Son (one of many names used by Taylor Brothers). The seller said the saw has a rosewood handle, but when I got it in hand I could see it is mahogany. In the seller's defense, it's hard to tell the wood species with all the black gunk on the handle, which is presumably a mix of oil, dirt, and darkening varnish. Unfortunately, there is a large chunk out of the side of the handle. The handle is attached with three steel screws that have truncated cone-shaped heads and standard brass split nuts.

    The second saw is a 26" handsaw which also has a mahogany handle. Additionally, the handle has steel side plates on both sides. The handle is attached with five steel truncated cone-shaped screws and nuts. The nuts are spanner type with slots in the sides. The plate has three etches which are similar to the etches on a saw posted in 2013 by geojoe at this link. In fact two of the etches are nearly identical, with the middle etch being totally different. The etches are as follows:

    Left: Taylor Brothers Adelaide Works Sheffield with a crown above and a paschal lamb and ADVANCE below.
    Center: Picture of a factory, presumably Adelaide Works.
    Right: Doubly Carbonized Imperial Cast Steel Warranted with crown above and paschal lamb and ADVANCE below.

    I Googled an image of a page from the 1890 Taylor Brothers catalog that shows several of their "ornamental" saws. The image isn't clear enough to tell if either of my saws is listed, but a few look like they could be similar.

    I plan to clean up and repair these two saws. I think they will make a nice pair given the similarities in their construction.

    IMG_1232.jpg IMG_1233.jpg IMG_1234.jpg IMG_1235.jpg
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    Last edited: Jun 24, 2019
  2. David

    David Most Valued Member

    Messages:
    273
    Hi Bob,
    Those will certainly make a nice pair when you've done your fine work on them. Although I've seen some of your restorations elsewhere, I expect that you'll have your work cut out for you with that backsaw repair. It's a bad loss and doesn't appear to be easy to fix. But they're both fine saws and I'm sure you will have made them look that way again.
    Please show us the completed restoration when it's done.
    David
     
  3. ray

    ray Administrator Staff Member

    Messages:
    637
    Hi Bob,

    Interesting couple of saws, what does that etch on the handsaw mean, looks to me like "Doubly Carbonized" which is a bit cryptic to say the least.

    Regards
    Ray
     
  4. summerfi

    summerfi Most Valued Member

    Messages:
    183
    Hi David and Ray,
    David, I agree the repair on the backsaw handle will be a challenge, but I have a plan. I think it will look OK, but like most repairs, it will not be invisible. With a busy summer, it will be Fall or Winter before I get around to working on saws again, so I have time to think about it more.

    Ray, I see the Doubly Carbonized Imperial Steel as just a marketing ploy. It's probably no different than most other saw steel, but sounds better to a potential buyer.

    Bob
     
  5. Dusty Shed Dweller

    Dusty Shed Dweller Most Valued Member

    Messages:
    101
    RE the Taylor Brothers backsaw. (a) Is the plate fitted really, really tightly into the spine? (b) Does the plate have a wavy edge or any cracks?

    I've got a theory on Taylor Bros saws, and await your reply with interest.
     
  6. ray

    ray Administrator Staff Member

    Messages:
    637
    Hi Dusty,

    Looking at the pictures and considering the age of the saw, I'd say it was originally made with a straight (non canted) blade, and so I'm going to guess that canted blade was caused by the toe getting knocked down, and that caused the heel of the brass back to kick up and break the mortice. Or at least lift far enough out of the mortice to allow sideways movement to crack the handle.

    Did I guess the theory correctly?
     
  7. summerfi

    summerfi Most Valued Member

    Messages:
    183
    Hi Dusty and Ray,
    I've not taken the saw apart yet, so I'm not sure how tightly the plate fits in the spine. It looks to be relatively tight. As for the plate itself, it is straight with no cracks.

    Ray, I agree that the toe end of the spine has slipped down onto the plate. We've all seen many backsaws with breaks in this area of the handle, though most don't go this far back. I've always assumed that this type of break was caused by a blow to the handle, but you may be on to something, Ray. The wood is quite thin along side the mortise. If the handle is twisted or otherwise put under strain, the leverage of the spine in the mortise could potentially break it. Below is a picture of another Taylor Brothers (not mine) with a very similar handle break to mine. I don't know if there is something different or unique about Taylor Brothers saws, but I'm interested in hearing Dusty's theory.

    Bob
    Taylor Bros.jpg