Shaw Hoole and Co

Discussion in 'Forum: Saw Identification and Discussion' started by Joe S, Jun 15, 2017.

  1. Joe S

    Joe S Most Valued Member

    Messages:
    311
    Ray et al
    I am presenting this saw for a couple of reasons.
    First it is an uncommon artifact and it needs recognition and help before it completely disintegrates with time.
    Simon in BSSM suggests that Shaw, Hoole and Co were originally Boothby, Hoole and Shaw, a merchant and manufacturing partnership from 1809 -1817. Simon doesn't quite know if this was an early incantation or later
    variation after Boothby. The mains include Joseph Shaw and William Hoole. Simon also suggests a similar mark to this one at about 1830.
    The specifics of the saw include a 14" blade tapering from 1 1/2 to 2' with a brass back. Shaw Hoole & Co Cast ! Steel is stamped into the back. Two split brass nuts fasten a beech handle to the saw. What I find interesting is the wonderful proportions and fineness of the handle. It only measures 3/4 " thick which is fine for a closed handle. I think I only have one other saw that thin. Most are 7/8" thick and a thin handle is very noticeable when in the hand.
    Secondly, we had a question some time ago about how far is too far in the restoration of a saw and what criteria do you follow when you feel it is necessary to clean a saw up. This is exactly how I got the saw and have done nothing to it. The seller I think scraped a little at the stamp to find the maker. I want to show you where we are starting out and suggest what I am going to do. To me it is significant enough to preserve yet not make it look new, not that that was ever going to happen. There is loss to the nose of the blade. The is a lot of surface rust as if it was sitting in a very wet environment but it doesn't look as though there is much pitting. We won't know until I start scraping the rust down to a cleaner blade. This is an imperative for the preservation on this saw. This saw won't be sharpened as I have no need for another working saw and to joint and file would reduce some blade depth. There seems to be paint on the brass back and is hiding an owners initials. The back will not be polished. The handle will be cleaned with a little soap and water to rid it of ingrained dirt and then only waxed to slow the drying process. .As you can see one of the fastener split nuts is missing but that will be left. At this point there is no wobble or looseness so there won't be a need to add the missing parts. Soooooo ...... this is the plan.
    We are in no hurry and I will present the saw a little differently when these things are complete. If you have any suggestions or input I would love to hear from the group even before I Shaw etc.DSCN6134 a.jpg Shaw etcDSCN6141 e.jpg Shaw etc DSCN6137 c.jpg Shaw etcnDSCN6139 d.jpg start out in case you think I am going too far or not enough.
    enjoy
    Joe S.
     
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  2. Underthedirt

    Underthedirt Most Valued Member

    Messages:
    171
    Thanks for sharing this saw Joe, arrised brass back, cast.steel & falling ampersand and the skinny handle with that leaning forward boss make it a very old saw, how fantastic! It's a lovely looking saw & the handle is in good shape, I can't wait to see what it looks like when you've finished.

    Regards

    Mari
     
  3. David

    David Most Valued Member

    Messages:
    234
    Hi Joe,
    Such an interesting saw, sadly in such rough shape. It'll certainly be a project to preserve that blade and I look forward to seeing your results. The handle looks very early to me, especially being as thin as it is. I think the little washing and waxing that you propose should make it look vibrant again.
    After rereading your post I'd probably cast my vote for the manufacture predating the Boothby partnership, but then I'm just playing the mugs game, rather than relying on any primary documents. In any case, I appreciate your posting it for us to see. Good luck with it.
    David
     
  4. Joe S

    Joe S Most Valued Member

    Messages:
    311
    Ray et al
    So... as promised.
    In the amount of time it took me last night to listen to three albums (R Cooder, J Winter and M Waters and turn the vinyl to each side) this is what we have. Mixed feelings on the results but some times we are our harshest critics.
    Observations.
    Scraping old wavy metal results in a wavy pattern. I didn't want to have to temper the contrast of dark and light but it could only be achieved with a light sanding of a "scotch pad" and 0000 steel wool. The rust was almost baked on which was something I hadn't come across before. There is very fine pitting but was not as bad as I thought. Some areas shaped like a banana and as you can see in the top area of the brass stiffener it has been wailed on as someone tried to get it straightened.
    The handle took the wax nicely but I wasn't going to continue too much more to get a thicker finish. It is satisfactorily covered and protected.
    I am tickled with the engraved owners initials, J McF. Is this an older script style but I would love to get some handle on the dating? Don't know if it is early or a later mid-Victorian or Edwardian script.
    In conclusion, the metal has most of the serious rust removed and should last a few more years. The wood is protected and I won't be putting it to any serious use which would harm it.
    Gone too far with the clean up or not far enough?
    enjoy
    Joe S. Shaw resto  DSCN6142.jpg Shaw resto DSCN6143 a.jpg Shaw resto DSCN6145 b.jpg Shaw resto DSCN6146 c.jpg Shaw resto DSCN6147 d.jpg
     
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  5. David

    David Most Valued Member

    Messages:
    234
    Nice job, Joe, done just right in my opinion. You should be justly proud of your work on this saw. The blade looks better than I could have imagined from the earlier pics, especially around the cheek where I thought it looked almost rusted through. Also, the handle is all one could want, looking well used and preserved, just nicely cared for. And that engraving is a surprise delight too. Its style doesn't indicate any particular time to me other than somewhere in the 19c, and probably made up by the engraver.
    I'm sure those fine tunes helped as well.
    David
     
  6. gmac

    gmac Member

    Messages:
    19
    Joe,

    I too agree, that you have done a great preservation job,

    could you please tell us, what you used to scrape the rust from the blade with?

    Graham.
     
  7. Joe S

    Joe S Most Valued Member

    Messages:
    311
    Thanks David and Graham
    Tis nothing more that an old 7/8" Marples chisel that I just sharpen on some 600 fine sandpaper and slightly round or soften the corners on so that I don't gouge the edge in to the scrape. The stroke is almost 45 degree to vertical like would be done with scraper plane. I sometimes spritz with an oil to keep the dust down and soften the scratching. I really try and keep the surface flat and steady. Not a whole lot more. I also really like the "BRI WAX" to finish it off.
    Joe S.
     
  8. Barleys

    Barleys Most Valued Member

    Messages:
    540
    What a beautiful saw: exemplifies why we're so besotted with them, and hats off to Joe for (as far as I'm concerned) exactly the right degree of skilful cleaning up.

    As the photo shows, my own Shaw,Hoole is clearly much later than Joe's, which I wouldn't have dated at much later than 1810-1815.
    IMG_1460.JPG
     
  9. rob1713

    rob1713 Member

    Messages:
    21
    You've made an excellent job of that Joe, well done.