Help Identify a W. Tyzack Tenon Saw

Discussion in 'Forum: Saw Identification and Discussion' started by Rowethren, Jun 14, 2022.

  1. Rowethren

    Rowethren Member

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    Hello, I am looking at getting into wood working so I am on the hunt for my first decent back saw. I found this W. Tyzack saw which is 15tpi and 10 inches long which sound perfect but I was wondering if anyone can help me date it? I have looked through the Tyzack catalogue but can't find anything that matches this. As far as I can tell the handle shape and the nonparei stamp would mark it as one of their more premium saws.

    Screenshot_20220613-120840__01__01.jpg Screenshot_20220613-121009__01.jpg
     
  2. shoarthing

    shoarthing Most Valued Member

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    Hi - any Sheffield backsaw with a cast steel saw-plate is worth having, if the plate is laterally straight.
    The handle form/style - I am not s Tyzack expert - implies a date around 110-ish years ago.
    Other backsaw-net-ers may have more informed views.
     
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  3. Rowethren

    Rowethren Member

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    Interesting, thanks for the help. Looking at the photos it looks straight so I think I will go for it. I guess you can't really go wrong for £20 anyway...
     
  4. Rowethren

    Rowethren Member

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    Had an alternative option made by Drabble and Sanderson it is a bit more expensive at £40 but looks like a great saw and I would guess a fair bit older judging by the use of split pins. Do you think the plate looks flat enough? It is slightly curved but not too bad.
    Screenshot_20220615-113512__01.jpg Screenshot_20220615-113608__01.jpg Screenshot_20220615-113735.jpg Screenshot_20220615-113809.jpg
     
  5. shoarthing

    shoarthing Most Valued Member

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    Rowethren - Hi - before buying a restoration-project off EBay; it might be best to ask yourself: “What exactly do I want this saw for? What joints - & in which timbers - shall I be cutting with it?”
     
  6. Rowethren

    Rowethren Member

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    I am only just breaking into woodworking and my first task is to build a bench. I was planning on using pine to build it with mortise and tenon joints and half lap joints if that helps.
     
  7. shoarthing

    shoarthing Most Valued Member

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    If you buy an elderly saw, your first project sill be restoring that saw - learning to sharpen & set it (at a bare minimum).
    Others may perhaps differ in their advice; but as a cabinetmaker, since the 1970s, would strongly recommend you focus your funds on obtaining a thoughtfully-designed modern backsaw.

    A suitable tool - now for large joints in modern softwood, then, later, finer joints in hardwoods - is the 12tpi/13tppi 11” ‘carcass saw’ by Veritas: it has just enough depth of cut for general work.

    Well-known older tradesmen have positive views of this range of modern Veritas saws -
    https://paulsellers.com/2011/08/looking-for-dovetail-saws-buy-veritas/
     
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  8. Rowethren

    Rowethren Member

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    I don't mind learning to prepare a saw, as you say they are skills I will need for any saw (unless I go for a hardened one...).

    I have seen a few people say it is worth buying a new high quality saw as it gives you a good reference point as to how a saw should cut. Been reading and watching loads of Paul Sellers content the last few weeks as well, he is such a helpful resource for a beginner!

    I am very tempted by a Veritas saw but they are really expensive, although not as much as the Thomas Flinn ones...
     
  9. Dusty Shed Dweller

    Dusty Shed Dweller Most Valued Member

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    Firstly, the practical cutting depth of a backsaw is half the plate depth, or you'll mung it.
    For the work you outline (building a bench in softer timbers) you're going to want something with a bit more plate depth and heft. I'd suggest a 14" saw filed rip in 11 points. I do 90% of my bench cabinet making with such a saw, and they're almost "10 a penny" as the old saying goes because every worker had one. I certainly wouldn't pay 40 quid for one.
    The Veritas saw mentioned is a good starter saw for woodworking (they're straight and they're sharp and they're good carcase saws), but it's too light, the plate too thin and the teeth too fine for your job. Clean up a $5 beater and see how you go.
    I'll give you a free tip that Mr Sellers won't..... Jointing your saw properly is the first, second and third most important process in getting a properly cutting saw. If your teeth aren't all the same height it will never cut well.
     
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