Disston "10"

Discussion in 'Forum: Saw Identification and Discussion' started by pmcgee, Jul 3, 2015.

  1. TobyC

    TobyC Most Valued Member

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    I was just trying to make your original "13 with 11 die stamped" accurate! :p
     
  2. David

    David Most Valued Member

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    Good on ya!
     
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  3. TobyC

    TobyC Most Valued Member

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  4. TobyC

    TobyC Most Valued Member

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  5. TobyC

    TobyC Most Valued Member

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  6. David

    David Most Valued Member

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    Hi Toby,
    I don't know if that saw was labeled out of ignorance. I've seen enough similar stamped brass plates on both English and American saws to be convinced that there must have been an active trade in them across the sea. I've no idea on which side they were produced and I've seen no information or research on who made them. They're sure fancy and, some might say, useless. Others like them a lot. The attached image is of a McNiece saw that the owner liked so much he had a blacksmith forge a make-do repair on the handle to keep it usable.
    Regards,
    David
     

    Attached Files:

    Last edited: Jul 9, 2015
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  7. TobyC

    TobyC Most Valued Member

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    Interesting, thanks!
     
  8. Bancroft3

    Bancroft3 Member

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    [QUO
    TE="David, post: 4357, member: 112"]Good on ya![/QUOTE] ck

    There was some discussion on the Disston "10" saw and a survey of how many were known to exist. I have one to add to the list. It was recently found in the wild.
    DSC01682.JPG DSC01671.JPG DSC01679.JPG DSC01685-001.JPG

    The stamping reads from top to bottom:
    EXTRA
    HENRY DISSTON
    PHILADA
    LONDON SPRING 10 WARRANTED
    REFINED

    There is a portion of an eagle above the stamping which suggests a rather early production date. Cannot definitely identify the remains of eagles to the right or left of the stamping.

    Also, there is an additional stamping stating the saw was "MADE FOR BARBER & YOUNG" which I presume was a hardware store or distributor.

    Brian
     

    Attached Files:

  9. David

    David Most Valued Member

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    Hello Brian,
    A very nice find! Barber & Young were a hardware store in Allentown Pa in the mid 1800's. They began as just Young Hardware in 1843 and shortly after that became Barber & Young, which lasted until 1860 when the name was changed again to M S Young & Co. I would guess that your saw is from the latter part of that c1845 to 1860 time period. I base that guess only on the plain handle lacking a lambs tongue and the lack of any nibs or hounds teeth before the horns, which are not very strong indicators but it's what there is. I could sure be wrong about that guess.
    Did you find it in the Eastern Pennsylvania area? I'm curious to know how far it might have traveled.
    David
     
  10. Bancroft3

    Bancroft3 Member

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    Hi David,
    Thank you for the great information! I'm amazed you knew about Barber & Young Hardware. I tried to research the name but came up with nothing. The saw came from central Georgia. Unfortunately, I have no information as to how it got there. Do you have any opinion as to when Disston stopped stamping eagles on handsaws?
    Brian
     
  11. David

    David Most Valued Member

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    308
    Hi Brian,
    I think I just googled the name on a good day and had better luck. Any opinion I might have about the eagle stamps would be a bit of a guess since so few saws come with any real dating proof before the arrival of the oldest Disston catalog we have, from 1876. A lot of folks have opinions, but there's not much proof to back them up. On that note, I think it's reasonable to say that he stopped stamping eagles sometime before 1865 when his son came into the biz. I've never seen a backsaw with eagles marked Disston & Son, only Henry Disston. I'll stretch further and guess he stopped stamping handsaws in the late 1850's, but I've no proof of it.
    Regards,
    David